youth

Sylvia Builds Success Brick by Brick

Sylvia, a young farmer, entrepreneur, and participant in our Kenya Makueni program, is proud to be able to support her family. She’s proud, too, that she’s making it possible for other young people to earn an income. She employs up to four young people in her brickmaking business, each of whom earns about $3 a day.

And, thanks to support from our program, the youth farming group that Sylvia belongs to is flourishing. They went from nearly abandoning farming to generating income from their fields and greenhouse and starting small businesses.

When the group first tried to raise kale on their farm, their lack of technical know-how led to failure and frustration. Some members began moving to towns in search of employment, but many stayed on when offered practical training. They learned a number of sound conservation agricultural practices like drip irrigation, and received seeds, a greenhouse, and a quarter acre of land to use. The group planted tomatoes in the greenhouse and peppers in the field, and received regular advice from our local partner. They made enough not only to cover their expenses and set aside personal savings but to start a Village Savings and Lending Association (VSLA) group. The VSLA will help members find even more ways to earn an income.

Sylvia took out one of the first VSLA loans to start a brick-making business. She hired four young people to help her at a penny a brick, eventually selling 5,000 bricks at a nickel apiece, for a net profit of $170. She has since been able to repay her loan and expand her business. She looks forward to continued success both as a farmer and a business owner and employer.

Picture caption: "Soil ripping, a conservation ag practice

Kenya Makueni Program is Led by Lutheran World Relief
4 Communities, 244 households, 6,221 individuals

11/01/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Tackling hunger, one seed at a time

For Darla Stewart and other Waverly First United Methodist Church members, a garden project has become a hands-on mission.

Stewart, an administrative assistant at the church, said the garden was planted this year to grow fresh food for the community and to raise funds for an overseas project through the Foods Resource Bank.

Stewart said the children who attend the church’s Sunday School program have been working on the garden to grow peas, lettuce, tomatoes and other vegetables. An acre of sweet corn was recently added.

This is teaching the children about charity, Stewart said. “It’s not just throwing money at something,” she said. “It’s actually doing mission [work] with their hands and their hearts to help others.”

05/11/2016 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

An FRB/4H partnership in Fremont, MI helps farmers overseas

The Fremont area Foods Resource Bank (FRB) Growing Project, in partnership with the John Deere Foundation (JDF) and local 4-H clubs, has been honored to have Lydia Breen (Ensley/Newaygo Co. 4-H) and Brendan Carroll (Grant Livestock 4-H) join them in “growing lasting solutions to world hunger.” 

The purpose of this collaboration, new in 2014,is to encourage agricultural learning among 4-H youth and to teach them about the development work FRB carries out overseas to help reduce world hunger.

10/18/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Nicaragua program uses farmer field schools to train young leaders

FRB's Nicaragua - Boaco program trains young adults to become leaders, equiping them with the skills to teach others in their community about the benefits of sustainable farming practices. 

07/02/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Uganda, Prosy moves from disability to ability

Looking back at her life before skills training, Prosy, a 23-year-old woman with a disability in her left leg, wonders where she would be if not for the food security, livelihood and entrepreneurship skills training she’s received from FRB’s Uganda-Kireka Lweza program at the Lweza Rehabilitation Center for disabled youth.

Rehabilitation Center students are disproving the widespread Ugandan belief that people with disabilities are unable to care for themselves or contribute to their communities. These students are now earning incomes, growing their own food, selling or bartering their extra production, starting small business, training others and working as consultants.

12/06/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Young FRB Volunteers Give up Pizza for Tanzania

Newsletter: 

Recently I was invited to dinner with the Vanden Bosch family, a family that in 2011 solicited help for a school project (see “Children Give Up Treat to Help Others in Need”). They followed that up in 2012 by giving up pizza for 6 weeks and documenting the amount they would have spent every time they thought about having pizza during that six weeks. 

01/11/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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