community

Community Greenhouses are Improving Lives

Juana is a member of a women’s collective greenhouse in her Guatemalan community. But long before she joined the program and began receiving instruction from local partner CIEDEG, she was watching and learning. She is a great example of how our food security programs reach “secondary beneficiaries” – those who are not officially registered, but whose lives improve just by taking note of what their neighbors are doing to grow more nutritious food.

Juana carefully observed how the greenhouses were constructed and saw the ways in which women began to grow a wider variety of foods both under cover and outdoors. She and her husband used their own savings to purchase a sheet of plastic in Guatemala City, and built a smaller version of the community greenhouses right next to their house. She bought some tomato seedlings and started other vegetables from seed in a small area of her greenhouse reserved as a nursery.

Now, in addition to the tender vegetables she grows indoors, Juana is also producing cool-weather veggies on her land, including carrots, broccoli, onion and celery. She was happy to be invited to join the community greenhouse collective as well to take advantage of the opportunity to grow even more food and market some of it along with the women in her collective.

CIEDEG encourages secondary beneficiaries like Juana to participate. It is the organization’s goal to expand access to a variety of healthy foods across the Nebaj area of Guatemala, and to empower families to stay intact by finding ways to earn incomes and flourish in their own villages.  Juana’s enthusiasm, willingness to innovate and success are inspiring others to try their hand at greenhouse production.

Caption: Juana in her greenhouse
Photo credit: Bethany Beachum


Guatemala Nebaj Quetzaltenango 
Led by Church World Service and Local Partner CIEDEG

06/11/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Community Action Plan: A Roadmap to Success

A process of community discernment encouraged by the program helped a village identify … and solve … their biggest obstacle to success: the lack of a road. With a four-mile footpath between the village and the nearest road, it was difficult to get produce to market or reach medical assistance, and impossible to get in or out on any vehicle larger than a motorbike.  Women in single file used to carry market goods on their heads to the road, then wait for a vehicle to come by which would allow them to hitch a ride. There was only one bus that went to town in the morning and came back in the evening.  If they missed it they had to go back home and try again the next day. Produce brokers would sometimes come by and offer to buy products from the waiting women, but at sharply discounted prices. 

So the villagers carefully crafted a community action plan to build a road.  First, they organized into subgroups to focus on specific tasks.  They planned the route, cleared the trees and shrubs, and widened and leveled out the path so vehicles could pass. It took them 3-½ months to complete but now cars and trucks can reach the village! The access opens up opportunities to rent a truck to take goods to market as a cooperative effort, or for people in the community to invest in cars. 

The community recently hired a motorcycle driver to come right to the village to pick up corn for market that they’d shelled as a group. Before the road was completed, he never would have come, or would have demanded a steep fee to leave the main road and take the path to the village. The road constitutes an enormous change for the better, and the community is proud that they made it happen through teamwork.

Caption: Community effort readies shelled corn to be picked up for market

Kenya Magarani
Led by World Renew and Local Partner ADS - Pwani
10 communities, 1,800 households, and 4,836 individuals

04/13/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Community Voices

“Having to leave the country to look for work is a huge cost, financially and in terms of the family and community, and people often return no better off than when they left. This program has made it possible for us to earn a living at home. Now we can say, ‘Here in Honduras there are riches.’ We didn’t go buy this food in the market. We produced it ourselves. That, to me, is being rich.” – Rafael

“We are grateful for [local partner] CASM because they work on a personal level in solidarity with families who have few resources. They encourage us to contribute our own efforts to carry out various community projects. They offer alternatives that are changing the way we live.” – Lilian  

“I’d never imagined that anything could be so effective for cooking as an eco-stove and also keep the smoke out of the house. It used to be impossible to control the smoke in the house with our traditional stoves. It damaged the roof and made the air unhealthy to breathe. The eco-stoves are energy efficient and economical – look at how few pieces of wood there are in there, but that’s all I’ll use all day to cook! Before, my husband was constantly carrying firewood for me. Now even he gets a rest.” – Lurbin

“I feel that we have achieved many changes in our community. Before, because we are so remote and it’s hard to get here, no government or international organizations ever came to offer us support. But this program has helped us so much. I feel really content and proud that I am improving my family’s nutrition and can even share all the products I have been able to grow. Greetings to all the donors who make this program possible, and thank you!” – Miguel Angel

Caption: Lurbin and her new eco-stove

Honduras Nueva Frontera
Led by Church World Service and Local Partner Comisión de Acción Social Menonita (CASM)
14 communities, 626 households, 3,130 individuals

04/09/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

“Hunger Months” Are a Thing of the Past

As the successful Mozambique Garden program winds to a close, families have more food and better nutrition during “hunger months” – the period between when stored food is eaten and the next harvest. Community members testified how much the program has helped them survive – and flourish! – through the off season, and expressed their gratitude to all. 

After traditional crops of corn, beans, cassava and peanuts were harvested, no one used to plant anything during the cool, dry months of June, July and August because of lack of rain. People depended on their dwindling stores of grain, and often lost livestock during that period because they couldn’t feed or water them.

But with our support, families now plant and irrigate vegetable gardens on communal plots of land arranged around community wells. They use abundant cattle manure to enrich the sandy soil and increase the nutritive value of the vegetables they grow. Where they used to get by during the off season on one meal a day of a cassava or maize porridge called xima (pronounced “shima”), they can now count on having two or three meals a day during that time. Their cassava or grain stores last longer when they mix their xima with tasty cassava leaves, cabbage, tomato and onion, and their health and energy improves.

A final survey indicates that 85% of families now grow enough to sell some of their crops or produce for income. Almost 83% said they have been able to save money to buy seeds for the next crop season and purchase household staples and needed medicines.

An interesting observation is that, while all participants now fertilize their gardens with manure from the area’s cattle, 78% of them had never used it on their crops prior to receiving instruction. They all said they would continue to fertilize row crops and gardens with manure.

Photo caption: Lush gardens fertilized with the area's abundant manure

Mozambique Garden Program
Led by World Hope International
16 communities, 1,455 households, 8,730 individuals


01/31/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Efforts by all result in water for all

My name is Marvin, and I’m the coordinator of our community water committee here in Nicaragua. After years of effort, we’re just about ready to inaugurate a system of piping purified spring water directly into all our homes.  You’ll understand what a big deal this is when you learn that our wives used to have to fetch water many times a day from a well almost half a mile away.  We never helped because men just didn’t do that in our community.

I used to prefer to keep to myself, so I was very unsure about accepting the responsibility when I was elected coordinator. I wanted to do something about our lack of access to clean water, though, so I decided to rise to the challenge.

We first presented our water problem years ago to our municipal authorities, and then to some international organizations, but we never got a response. When FRB started a new program with World Renew and Acción Médica Cristiana (AMC) that included water, we requested their support.

With lots of coordination with the technical staff of AMC and the municipality, we started the process of preparing a project proposal, taking field measurements, preparing a budget and submitting our proposal. We’ve all donated labor and funds, too. What a great achievement it’s been for us – a lesson in persistence and patience – to have clean water coming from a tap! Our children will be healthier, and our wives are done for good with the drudgery of hauling water.

We’re better organized as a community. Everyone’s more willing to volunteer and give of their time without expecting payment: no one’s saying “not my problem” anymore.  And we share more work with our wives now.

Caption: Marvin pauses as visitors inspect the work on the water system
 
Nicaragua Farmer Program
Led by World Renew and local partner Acción Médica Cristiana
7 communities, 361 households, 1,625

01/12/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

These Little Piggies Went to Market…and Changed Fortunes

The simple gift of a piglet from FRB’s Dominican Republic Bateyes program changed the fortunes of two mothers. And they, in turn, are “paying it forward,” enabling 10 neighboring families to make life-changing improvements to their circumstances as well.


Ramona is a widow with three children who feared she would become destitute. But things started to turn around when she received and raised her first piglet. She gave four of that sow’s initial offspring to neighbors and sold eight, using the proceeds to invest in more animals. She’s sold over 50 pigs to date and made more than $4,000.  Ramona’s business has thrived with help from her children and the day laborers she hires from among her neighbors. She now has nearly 100 animals and a brighter future.


Likewise, Juliana, mother of three, saw everything improve thanks to that one small gift. She has made $620 so far from selling piglets after giving six to neighbors. She’s thrilled that the money helped her send her two sons to school and pay for their school supplies, uniforms, backpacks, shoes and transportation.  


Best of all, Juliana’s pig business has brought her back to her community. She used to be a domestic worker in the nation’s capital, Santo Domingo, and made the commute home only on weekends.  Now, she earns enough to stay home, raise and sell pigs, and run a small grocery store she and her husband opened in their home.

Photo courtesy of CWS. Caption: Juliana with one of her pigs

Dominican Republic Bateyes Program
Led by Church World Service and local partner Servicio Social de Iglesias Dominicanas (SSID)
22 communities, 465 households, 3,255 individuals

11/14/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Thank you from g.r.o.w

FRB, 

Thank you so much for the opportunity to be part of your ministry.

While working on a growing project I saw people get their hands dirty, I saw community grow, and I saw people motivated by something other than themselves. Jesus taught us to serve, and it was great to see people doing that.

01/16/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Nicaragua, communities and visitors build bread ovens together

Several travelers – FRB board members and staff, university students, and growing project participants – recently traveled to Nicaragua to live and work with participants in FRB’s Nicaragua-Farmer program. The visitors, side by side with community members, built fuel-efficient bread ovens. They carried bricks and water significant distances to the worksites, plunged their hands into a mixture of local materials (different types of soil, horse manure, glue from inside the bark of the guásimo [WA see mo] tree), and helped to complete four brick ovens with the local families.

07/10/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Kenya, 10 self-help groups selected as leaders in their communities

To promote greater commitment to agricultural development among the Maasai participants in FRB’s Kenya-Ngong Najile program, ten of the program’s 39 established self-help groups were selected for special training to become “servant leaders” to the others. Their communities will benefit from the stewardship, good examples, knowledge, improved relationships, conflict resolution, and goal-reaching of these groups.

The program addresses food security for these once semi-nomadic, pastoralist people and encourages them to form inclusive groups across gender, age and political lines. The groups participate in trainings on

06/07/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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